Preview Mode Links will not work in preview mode

Pilotcast


Pilotcast is the podcast for pilots, by pilots.  Join Pilot Tiffany, Pilot Kent, and Pilot Bill for interesting discussions and interviews, some news or industry coverage, and a whole lot of fun virtual hangar flying.

Jan 30, 2006

Special guest "CFI Terry" Lankford, aviation author, weather expert and retired FAA flight service briefer, joins the Hangar Flying with Pilot Dan, Student Pilot Jason, and Pilot Mike.

  • Pilot Kent is on the road. Student Pilot Jason joins.  
  • Jason has correction on the the story of the "drunk pilot" who stole a Cessna in Connecticut. The tower was not in operation.
  • Jason joined a fly-in at LNS, Lancaster, PA on January 28th.  A good time was had by all.
  • Some of Jason's pictures  (more below):

Planes and pilot buddies at the LNS Fly-in 2006.01.28 iPod Nano tuned to the Pilotcast in flight!
Click on a picture to see a larger version

"CFI Terry" Lankford joins the Pilotcast.

Check out the aviation books written by Terry T. Lankford:

Understanding Aeronautical Charts (1996.04.01)
Cockpit Weather Decisions (1997.09.01)
Aircraft Icing: A Pilot's Guide (1999.8.24)
Weather Reports, Forecasts & Flight Planning (1999.12.20)
Aviation Weather Handbook (2000.10.19)
Controlling Pilot Error: Weather (2001.06.04)
Radar & Satellite Weather Interpretation for Pilots (2002.06.21)
Using Aeronautical Charts (2002.11.12)
  • Terry is a Gold Seal Certified Flight Instructor, 1997 Flight Safety Award winner, former FAA Aviation Safety Counselor.
  • Terry is a partner in a Cessna 172.
  • Terry is a retired FAA weather briefer from the FAA Oakland AFSS and a weather enthusiast.
    • What does "VFR not recommended mean?" 
    • Briefers are following the handbook.
    • Will a briefer EVER say, "VFR is recommended?"
    • One pilot who called Terry hung up too fast.
    • You can get the TIBS information on the same "1-800-WX-BRIEF" call.
    • Terry's take on the outsourcing of FSS to Lockheed-Martin.
    • National Association of Air Traffic Specialists http://naats.org
    • FSS is not used for airline or corporate flights.
    • The pilots who have the least experience and the least capable aircraft need FSS the most.
    • Does a FSS give briefings to other than pilots?
    • The problem with regional FSSs is that not all are kept busy.
    • Do FSSs get enough PIREPS?
      • The best way to give reports.
      • Be subjective.
      • What is severe turbulence?
      • When you read a PIREP note what kind of aircraft is making the report.
      • Almost any ice report from small aircraft means the pilot is a test pilot.
    • Calling the FSS for TFRs in region.
    • Mike's story about a near encounter with a TFR after getting a FSS briefing.
    • Jason's plane called FSS Radio while airborne and ended talking to two FSSs at once.
    • How to call up FSS in the air.
      • Call the nearest FSS "radio"
      • Give your location and what frequency you're monitoring.
    • What does Terry think of DUATS?
    • Decoded briefings vs. coded.
    • Do the FSS briefers resent outside vendors like DUATS?
    • How the technology handles changing weather conditions.
    • If DUATS is down you can call the FSS, not vice-versa.  FSS will fail over calls to provide coverage.
  • Terry's book on aviation charts.
  • There are reports that GPS receivers have failed.
  • Terry's take on weather.
    • ICE!
      • Forecasts of icing.
      • The aviation weather center in Kansas City is developing a graphical AIRMET.
      • If there are no clouds there will be no ice.
      • If you are IFR and you pick up ice advise the controller.  
      • Worry about a FAR violation later.
      • Advise the controller if an instruction will subject you to ice.
      • Always have an escape plan.
    • Weather is a hard thing for pilots to learn.
    • Weather is not a certain thing.  You have to learn to deal with probabilities.
    • Weather forecasters cannot be held liable for weather forecasts.  
    • Briefers must provide all information they have.
    • Pilots learn by observing the weather they encounter.
    • Terry is developing a new program for educating pilots on weather.

In the news:

  • A CFI and student crash in Michigan
  • Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta again says the FAA needs users Fees.  The AOPA is protesting.
  • Please send comments on the NPRM for the permanent Washington ADIZ before February 6.  Send copies of your comments to congress. See Pilotcast #007 for instructions on how to send your comments.
  • The Las Vegas airport says, "No thanks" to accommodating the Airbus A380.
  • A passenger jumps out of a taxiing 737.

Author Rinker Buck of "Flight of Passage" will join the Pilotcast soon.


Some of Jason's pictures of the Fly-in on January 28th at KLNS, Lancaster, PA.

For more pictures and descriptions see http://hpnpilot1200.org/gallery/LNSFlyin?page=1">
Click on a picture to see a larger version
DSCN0638.sized DSCN0613.sized
more_on_the_ramp_at_LNS.thumb DSCN0612.sized
DSCN0615.sized helicopter_panel.sized
Toby_crop.sized crowd_8.sized
crowd_5.sized crowd_4.sized
on_the_ramp_at_LNS.sized 150_5072_20D_01_Medium.sized
DSCN0627.sized DSCN0633.sized

Pilotcast show notes are at http://www.pilotcast.com


Jim Howard
over thirteen years ago

Great podcast, CFI Terry is a terffic guest, bring him back soon.

One little nit, the reason Las Vegas choose not to upgrade for the A380 is because there were no plans by any airline to schdule A380 flights in to Vegas. What Airbus and the A380 customer airlines were hoping was that they could use KLAS as an alternate for A380 flights into KLAX.

I suspect that what will happen is that Airbus and its customers will wind up paying for the airfield upgrades at KLAS. When you think about it, there are very, very few cities that could easily accomodate an A380 load of passengers showing up unannounced. Airbus needs KLAS.

This is not unprecidented, for several years Boeing paid a contractor to keep the Midway Island airport open so that Boeing\'s twin engine long ranger airliners could fly shorter transpacific routes. If they didn\'t, then more airlines might have ordered the four engine A340 in the days before Jet-A prices went up so much.